The 5 Most Common Problems in Open Source Software Development

Many software developers are already switching from proprietary to open source software due to the latter's numerous benefits. Such software is incredibly flexible and can be developed at a lower cost than the former. However, open source software development may not be as easy as it sounds. There are several problems you may encounter as you develop your own software. Here are 5 of the most common problems which you need to brace yourself for:

Misunderstanding Open Source – It's Not Free

Ask a random person what they think about open source software (OSS) and they are liable to tell you that it is free software--source code that anyone can use and edit.  They are only partly right, and they are wrong about a major issue – OSS is not free by any means, but it is usually cheaper than proprietary software.

The Biggest Risks You Take With Open Source Software

Open source software (OSS) is currently a hot item, but there are many good reasons to do some research before jumping right in. OSS differs from proprietary software in many important ways, and to be successful you will need to thoroughly investigate how your business model might benefit from switching to OSS.

DoD opts for OSS

The U.S. Department of Defense may teach you a thing or two about open source software (OSS). After spending years following the open-source trend, DoD technology representatives have laid out a firm opinion on open source—and it likely isn’t what you’d think.

Disaster Planning for the Web

"Never let a good crisis go to waste." That’s the mantra a former operations vice president I worked with liked to use. She believed that crises themselves weren’t the problem, but rather our failure to learn from them. At Synaxis, our hearts and minds are with those from Wilmington to Boston, and New York to Detroit, who are struggling in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. Indeed, two of our staff members work out of offices in Washington and New York City. But we are also ever mindful of the lessons that organizations should take from this disaster.
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